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A massive data leak has been reported on Twitch

Twitch’s situation might be about to grow a lot messier. The purported breach, leak, or whatever you want to call it, has affected Amazon’s streaming platform, but the ultimate effect is the same. On the shadier areas of the internet, a 125GB torrent of, well, everything Twitch has to offer has been made public, which may mean major trouble not only for Twitch but for many others connected to the site.

About 100 GB of data was available online.

According to the records, in the last two years, Twitch’s top streamers made millions of dollars from the Amazon-owned firm.

“The earnings list got my figure 100% correct,” Fortnite streamer BBG Calc told BBC News:

Two additional streamers informed BBC News that the leaked statistics were “about right” and represented their earnings.

Those behind the purported breach also claimed to have the video platform’s source code.

A massive data leak has been reported on Twitch 2

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Payments appear to have been made between August or September 2019 and October 2021, according to papers published on internet forums. According to certain online versions, well-known streamers such as CriticalRole of the Dungeons & Dragons channel, Canadian xQC, and American Summit1g are among the top earners.

It was not confirmed by Twitch whether the information was authenticated or not.

Aside from income information, the papers appear to contain the site’s source code as well as technical data for goods and platforms that have yet to be published.

And the evidence is accumulating that at least part of the data is accurate.

According to security experts, the files contain internal server data that can only be viewed by Twitch personnel.

And if it’s all true, it’ll be the largest data breach I’ve ever seen, wiping out an entire company’s most important data in one fell swoop.

Metadata appearing on online forums purports to indicate data folders named after major programme areas, such as:

“core configuration packages” 

“devtools” (developer tools)

“information security” (information security)

Another folder appears to include information regarding Amazon’s unannounced game-store platform, nicknamed Vapor, which is intended to compete with established giants like Steam and the Epic Games Store.

The papers also contain “part one” source code for Twitch’s website and related services, implying that there is more unpublished data.

Sanskriti

Sanskriti loves technology in general and ensures to keep TheDigitalHacker audience aware of the latest trends, updates, and data breaches.
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