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Chrome spy on you, Here is how to get away.

While we open our browser to look at the web, who knows who is looking back at us? It has been found by the latest privacy experiment that Chrome ushered more than 11,000 tracker cookies into the browser, in a single week. Reports suggest switching to Firefox.

Over a recent week of web surfing, users peered into the hood of Chrome and they found that it brought along a few thousand friends more. News, shopping and even government sites quietly tag the browser to let ad and data companies ride shotgun while you clicked around the Web. It is thus clear that the Chrome browser looks a lot like surveillance software.

Reports suggest users to immediately switch over to a new version of non-profit Mozilla’s Firefox, which has default privacy protections. Some users also reported that switching involved less inconvenience than others might imagine.

A recent study also revealed that in a week, Chrome requested for over 11,189 tracker cookies which would have been ushered straight into the PC, but was automatically blocked by Firefox. Chrome also welcomes trackers even at websites you would think would be safe and private. But it is not the case since such cookies are set up everywhere. It seems like there is no place safe for visiting insurance and service’s log-in pages. But that’s not even half of it.

Look in the upper right corner of your Chrome browser. Do you see a face or a name encircled? If so, you are logged in to the browser, and Google might target ads into your PC or, it might be even tapping into your web activities. Users might not even recall signing-in, well, I don’t, either. Chrome has started with this automatically when you use Gmail.

Chrome is sneakier on your phone as well. Whenever you conduct a search, Chrome sends your location to Google. Even if you stop sharing your location, Chrome would still be able to share your coordinates, though with less accuracy.

Firefox isn’t safe from all cookies, it doesn’t share your browsing data with Mozilla or any to any third party directly advertise or monetize its users.

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Kelley

I Kelley is a tech enthusiast, a programmer, and a football player. She deeply believes that technology has now the capability to shape the future of people if used in the right direction.
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