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Google finally takes a step to protect the user’s privacy

Advertisers are insanely tracking users and in the execution, Google was slapped with privacy issue on chrome and finally, Google has taken action is good.

Google announced a new initiative will help users to protect their privacy and make webspace a clean space in the long term.

This new proposal has a clear mention of a feature in the Google Chrome browser that will allow chrome users to block the tracking easily.

Image result for Google builds new privacy controls for the web

Today’s proposal for a new open standard extends this by looking at how Chrome can close the loopholes that the digital advertising ecosystem can use to circumvent that. And soon, that may mean that your browser will feature new options that give you more control over how much you share without losing your anonymity.

Browsers already include security sandboxes; restrictions designed to confine malware and limit its possible damage. Google’s proposed privacy sandbox would similarly restrict tracking technology, according to proposal details Google published.

The privacy sandbox is “a secure environment for personalization that also protects user privacy,” said Justin Schuh, a director of Chrome engineering focused on security matters, in a privacy sandbox blog post. “Our goal is to create a set of standards that is more consistent with users’ expectations of privacy.”

Privacy is a major concern among tech giants, with Apple leading the charge in many ways. The debate has proved challenging for Google, which offers useful, free services like search and Gmail that show ads. It’s also one of the biggest companies’ other websites and app publishers use to show ads. The issue has been especially pointed for Chrome, where protecting our privacy is at odds with its ad business.

The privacy sandbox, the result of months of work by Google researchers, is a major step that, if it works and is accepted by websites and advertisers, could help Google out of its privacy pickle.

Targeted ads — those that are customized according to preferences websites and advertisers infer from our online behaviour — are worth more to publishers. Google also released study figures that say publishers’ ad revenue drops 52% when browsers block the text files called cookies used to track our behaviour target ads. Source:

James J

James has been writing about tech since 2009 after spending 25 years in a computer research lab studying and improving the future of computers. He watches Netflix sci-fi with his pet, enjoying spicy snacks.
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