NewsTechUpdate

In Florida, a Tesla on autopilot collides with a parked police vehicle

On Saturday, yet another case of tesla was being reported, an autopilot Tesla crashed into a Florida Highway petrol cruiser after the police officer pulled over to help a broken-down car on the highway.

The Tesla driver, who has not been identified, was traveling along I-4 near Orlando at 5 a.m. The car crashed into the trooper’s vehicle on the left side, then the disabled Mercedes, according to the Florida Highway Patrol.

The Mercedes driver had minor injuries, while the Tesla driver, 27, and the trooper, 27, were unharmed. According to FHP, the Tesla “narrowly missed” striking the trooper who was standing outside the police car.

“No commercially available motor vehicles today are capable of driving themselves,” the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said in a statement. “Every available vehicle requires a human driver to be in control at all times, and all state laws hold human drivers responsible for the operation of their vehicles.”

Tesla’s Autopilot function was blamed for 17 injuries, 11 collisions, and one fatality since January 2018, according to the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration, which started an inquiry in mid-August.

In the years since it was initially launched in Tesla vehicles, Autopilot has been chastised for a lack of an efficient driver monitoring system (DMS) and the convenience with which some users have been able to overcome the limited driver attention sensors, letting cars run in traffic without a driver in the seat.

Even though some users ignore Tesla’s warnings, drivers must remain attentive and watch traffic ahead when using Autopilot. They must also keep their hands on the steering wheel.

“Current Autopilot features require active driver supervision and do not make the vehicle autonomous,” says the automakers of Tesla.

Just over a week after two US Senators requested an inquiry into Tesla’s marketing practices, the incident took place. In connection to what the firm terms “Full Self-Driving,” which has created its own controversy despite being on the market for a far shorter time. Despite Tesla’s small print and acknowledgment to authorities that it is not capable of self-driving, the Senators have requested the FTC to look into how the system is promoted to consumers and its claims of delivering self-driving capabilities.

Sanskriti

Sanskriti loves technology in general and ensures to keep TheDigitalHacker audience aware of the latest trends, updates, and data breaches.
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