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Japanese researchers use optical fiber to set a new world record for internet speed

Researchers from Japan’s National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) have achieved a new world record for long-haul transmissions of 319 terabits per second across a distance of 3,001 kilometers. Using a 4-core optical fiber with a standard diameter of 0.125 mm, Puttnam successfully transmitted S, C, and L-bands across extended distances. They claimed that the use of erbium and thulium-doped fiber amplifiers, as well as distributed Raman amplification, enabled them to accomplish so.

The teams claimed to have built a transmission system that could fully use wavelength division multiplexing technology. A combination of amplifier technologies was used to demonstrate transmission at a data rate of 319 Tbps. They also made history by producing 957 petabits per second x km, a world record for optical fibres of standard outer diameter.

“NICT and research groups around the world have begun to explore S-band transmission, leading to several new records for transmission capacity in optical fibers, but transmission distance has been limited to only a few tens of kilometers, they said. 

According to the researchers, in addition to the C- and L-bands, which are commonly utilized for high-data-rate and long-haul transmission, The team also took use of the S-transmission band’s capacity, which had previously been underutilized beyond single-span transmission.

The 4-core optical fibre, which has a standard cladding diameter, can be cabled using existing equipment, according to the researchers, who believe that it will enable realistic high-data-rate transmission in the near future.

According to them, the proliferation of new communication services beyond 5G requires a new study that will also assist in the development of the backbone communication system.

Wide- the band will be created as stated by researchers. long-distance transmission systems, and how they can help low-core-count multi-core fibers and other new SDM fibres transmit more data. Not only that, but they also want to expand the transmission range to include trans-oceanic distances.

Sanskriti

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