HomeUpdateThe resurrection of the serious threat bonet

The resurrection of the serious threat bonet

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Last Updated on 28/02/2022 by Nidhi Khandelwal

One of the most serious and well-known threats has reappeared. The botnet was shut down by international officials in January 2021. The Emotet’s executables received a damaging upgrade from law enforcement. And it appeared like the trojan’s narrative was coming to an end.

The resurrection of the serious threat bonet 1

TrickBot no longer functions alone and supplies Emotet, according to reports from November 2021. ANY.RUN, together with industry peers, were among the first to discover the appearance of Emotet’s malicious papers.

And this February, we’ve seen a particularly active wave, with crooks carrying off a slew of attacks and climbing to the top of the rankings. If you’re interested in learning more about malware or investigating it, you can use ANY.RUN, an interactive sandbox for detecting and analyzing cyber risks.

Emotet is able to escape detection due to its polymorphic nature and various modules. The malware’s creators are continually changing their strategies, approaches, and procedures in order to render existing detection standards obsolete. To stay infected, it downloads further payloads through a series of processes. Its behavior makes it nearly impossible to remove malware. It spreads quickly, provides false signs, and adapts to the demands of attackers.

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Emotet has had a number of lucky breaks over its history. However, following the global police operations in January 2021, we were confident that it would be permanently removed. Several gang members were detained, servers were taken over, and backups were destroyed by joint enforcement.

Nidhi Khandelwal
Nidhi Khandelwal
Nidhi is a tech news/research contributor at TheDigitalHacker. She publishes about techno geopolitics, privacy, and data breach.
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