Update

The severity of COVID-19 can be measured with the help of a new technology

With the COVID-19 pandemic turning into an epidemic in India, doctors all over the nation are trying their very best to find out an extra set of measures to control the spreading of the deadly virus.

To date, medical practitioners are not able to find out the severity of the disease until and unless there are visible symptoms and by the time the person starts showing the symptoms, it is already very late.

A technology developed by an Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay professor may lead to a detection kit as one of the world’s best pharmaceutical companies has come hand in hand with IIT Bombay to come with a detection tool.

Reportedly, the IT team of IIT, Bombay which is being led by Sanjeeva Srivastava from the Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering in collaboration with medical researchers of Kasturba Hospital for Infectious Diseases, Mumbai, has reported six different proteins that might differentiate the COVID-19 patients from severe to non-severe ones.

“We have entered into a collaboration with Merck to develop a simple diagnostic kit using our patented technology since mass spectrometers are expensive and can’t be used by hospitals,” Srivastava told DH.

“We have entered into a collaboration with Merck to develop a simple diagnostic kit using our patented technology since mass spectrometers are expensive and can’t be used by hospitals,”

There has also been a collaboration with Merck to develop a diagnostic kit using the patented technology as the whole process is expensive. The company has also given funds worth ₹1.75 crores to create a Center of Excellence at IIT for the effective development of the diagnostic kit.

The whole process is still in making, but if proved totally successful, this can turn out to be evolutionary for asymptomatic patients as they will be able to know the severity of their infection, hence, taking preventive measures at right time.

Anamika

Anamika focuses on data privacy, data policy, digital policies, and puts users' privacy first. She loves exploring new tech and spends time looking around business politics and its impact on users and small businesses.
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