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Twitter to use Apple-owned App Tracking Transparency for targeted Ad tracking

If you are an iOS 14.5 user, Apple’s App Tracking Transparency allows developers to request for permission to monitor iOS users, something they used to be allowed to do for free. With Twitter’s new update, it has joined the ranks of other developers in introducing a prompt on iOS that asks users to enable Ad tracking feature.

Twitter’s key reason for responding to the request is simple: getting the feature available enables it to serve “better” advertisements. The organization provides a guide to settings to make certain changes. Further Twitter explains it’s action as,”Keep ads relevant to you by allowing Twitter to track data from other companies on this device, like apps you use and websites you visit. 

It’s a relatively astounding low-key move to persuade consumers to encourage Twitter to monitor them, given that the company cited Apple’s inclusion of App Tracking Transparency in iOS 14.5 as a possible challenge in its most recent earnings report (PDF) as it read, ”We continue to expect total revenue to grow faster than expenses in 2021, assuming the global pandemic continues to improve and that we see modest impact from the rollout of changes associated with iOS 14.5. How much faster will depend on various factors, including our execution on our direct response roadmap and macroeconomic factors.”

Facebook and Instagram took a much more direct path to persuade people that their use of ad monitoring is acceptable, even going so far as to include a vague threat that allowing tracking would “help keep Facebook/Instagram free of charge.” Companies like Twitter and Facebook rely on monitoring users to fund their independent, often very profitable ad businesses. After all, it is usually commercial purchases that pay for free social networks, and user data aids in the targeting of such advertisements. 

In contrast to Facebook’s fear-mongering alert to iOS users, Twitter opted to be more reserved about the situation.

According to some recent polls, about 4 percent of US consumers opt for tracking and, with Google considering its own solutions for blocking monitoring on Android, people may just have to get used to applications approaching them and asking for free info.

Khushi

Khushi is an avid reader and loves analyzing companies in the digital space. Her interest is in online marketing, business, startups, and politics. She does everything perfectly by taking extra time.
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