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US officials: Biden also contemplating military response to fight cyberattack 

Officials from the United States increased the pressure on businesses and foreign foes to combat cyber criminals on Sunday, saying President Joe Biden is reviewing all measures, including a military reaction, to combat the rising problem.

As in order to defend the nation against ransomware criminals, the Biden administration is going up for “ all of the options” told by U.S Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo in an interview on Sunday. 

As Raimondo didn’t give much detailed information about the options they are looking for. However, she stated that the subject will be discussed when President meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin later this month. The increased threat of cyberattacks has prompted the Biden governments to take a tougher position toward Russia, which is suspected of hiding some of the culprits.

“We’re not taking anything off the table as we think about possible repercussions, consequences, or retaliation,” Raimondo said.

Recalling the previous attacks, the largest fuel pipeline in the U.S was attacked, the world’s largest meatpacker was targeted by the criminals, causing worries for fuel and food supply disruption.

Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm stated separately in an interview with CNN that US foes have the potential to take down the country’s entire power infrastructure, noting “thousands of attacks on all aspects of the energy sector”.

Following the high-profile strikes, Biden to put the topic of Russia sheltering hackers on his meeting with Putin. 

Officials believe the White House intends to use the June 16 meeting to send a strong message to Russian President Vladimir Putin. The instability of the computer systems used to carry out such cyberattacks might will be the next stage according to some cyber specialists. Officials in the United States are urging private enterprises to be more alert and open in their response to assaults. On Sunday, Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg said the May attack on Colonial Pipeline, which resulted in temporary fuel shortages, demonstrated the broad ramifications of a private corporation being hacked.

“Part of our vulnerability on cybersecurity is you’re only as strong as your weakest link,” he said in an interview.

When companies are attacked, Granholm said they should notify the federal government and stop paying the attackers.

“You shouldn’t be paying ransomware attacks, because it only encourages the bad guys.”

She said she opposes ransomware payments but isn’t sure if Biden or Congress is willing to make them illegal.

Sanskriti

Sanskriti loves technology in general and ensures to keep TheDigitalHacker audience aware of the latest trends, updates, and data breaches.
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