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What is DisplayPort 2.0 all about, and it’s Coming In 20XX?

DISPLAY GURUS VESA has revealed the DisplayPort 2.0 specification which will allow for enough bandwidth to support 8K resolutions and above.

Presently, those who shun HDMI and Thunderbolt 3 over USB-C connections for their monitors will likely be using DisplayPort 1.4. That is a decent enough port, as far as ports go, but with DisplayPort 2.0 users can expect bandwidth that tops out at 80Gbps, which is triple that of DisplayPort 1.4.

Image result for DisplayPort 2.0 is coming in 2020

When DisplayPort 2.0 comes around next year, VESA reckons it will deliver a whole range of monitor options, from supporting a massive 16K screen with HDR at 60Hz to three 4K displays running at 90Hz with HDR enabled.

“The advantages of DP 2.0 are enjoyed by individuals across both the native DP connector as well as the USB Type-C connector, which carries the DP audio/video signal through DisplayPort Alt Mode,” swooned VESA.

“DP 2.0 is backward compatible with older versions of DisplayPort and includes all of the key features of DP 1.4a, supporting visually lossless Display Stream Compression (DSC) with Forward Error Correction (FEC), HDR metadata transport, and other advanced features.”

“The increased video bandwidth performance of DP 2.0 carried over the USB-C connector enables simultaneous higher-speed USB data transfer without compromising display performance. DP 2.0 uses the Thunderbolt 3 physical interface (PHY) layer while maintaining the flexibility of the DP protocol for boosting the data bandwidth and promote convergence across industry-leading IO standards.”

Given external 4K displays haven’t become commonplace in the computing world just yet as they take a pretty powerful machine to run smoothly if you do anything graphically intensive, you might say VESA is getting ahead of itself.

But not only do standards in tech move quite fast and the industry has to catch up, but also creative types love super-high-resolution displays, so this upcoming standard might tickle their fancy in all their right places.

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James J

James has been writing about tech since 2009 after spending 25 years in a computer research lab studying and improving the future of computers. He watches Netflix sci-fi with his pet, enjoying spicy snacks.
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