HomeUpdateMaze ransomware developed something very useful for the malware operators

Maze ransomware developed something very useful for the malware operators

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Last Updated on 13/02/2022 by Nidhi Khandelwal

The developers of the Maze ransomware resurfaced this week, sharing the master decryption keys for the Egregor, Maze, and Sekhmet malware operations.

Maze ransomware developed something very useful for the malware operators 1

It was always planned that once the Maze ransomware operation was shut down in October 2020, the decryption keys would be made public, allowing remaining victims to retrieve their files.

In a BleepingComputer forum post on Tuesday night, some fourteen months later, the purported ransomware developer published the decryption keys.

While the developer claims that publishing the keys was always their intention, it is widely assumed that they did so now as a gesture of goodwill in light of the recent arrests and server seizures.

Other noteworthy ransomware news this week included the FBI releasing technical insights on the LockBit 2.0 ransomware, a free decrypter for the TargetCompany malware, and Puma announcing a data breach as a result of the Kronos ransomware attack.

The malware BlackCat (ALPHV) has been related to the BlackMatter and DarkSide gangs.

Former members of the famed BlackMatter/DarkSide ransomware operation have stated they are part of the Black Cat ransomware group, also known as ALPHV.

Maze ransomware developed something very useful for the malware operators 2

The FBI has released technical data about the Lockbit ransomware as well as protection advice.

In a fresh flash notice published on Friday, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) disclosed technical data and indicators of breach linked with LockBit ransomware assaults.

Nidhi Khandelwal
Nidhi Khandelwal
Nidhi is a tech news/research contributor at TheDigitalHacker. She publishes about techno geopolitics, privacy, and data breach.
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